Careers Programme Planning

Dr Farheen Khan from National Careers Week takes us through some key planning elements when building a careers programme. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed as a new careers leader. Our responsibilities, and the hours allocated to delivering careers guidance and a comprehensive careers education program, often feel woefully mismatched. Over my seven years as a careers leader, I learnt that the way through is to plan out the bare bones of your careers program for each year group as soon as you have access to your school calendar. Read on to discover her top tips on priorities, the importance of careers guidance and the essential element of building a team to deliver the programme.

#CareersLeadersCan 2021 – Social Media Highlights

Last year we produced highlights pages for both #NAW2021 and #NCW2021. We thought it would be nice to provide a space to highlight some of the wonderful tweets coming through for The Careers and Enterprise Company #CareersLeadersCan campaign. Have you tweeted yet? Do you feature below?

My Careers Story: Russell George

My Careers Story is a new series where a prominent Careers professional takes us on a journey through their history in careers education. They provide their key takeaways, providing some insight into where the future lays for them or Careers education in general. In the first piece in this series, we hear from Russell George.

The future of the Mock Interview

On Tuesday we published a piece urging you to go beyond the traditional approach to mock interviews and recruitment preparation for students. With more and more organisations making use of Artificial Intelligence to shortlist candidates, it is essential that people are exposed to these recruitment practices from an early stage. To learn a little more about how this can work in practice, we sat down with Mike Baker-Munton, Co-Founder and CEO of InterviewBot. Below Mike explores the theory behind providing young people with more interview practice and how technology can play a central role in levelling the playing field.

The end of the firm handshake?

I was standing in front of a mirror in an ill-fitting suit, repeatedly sticking my hand out while practicing, ‘hello, my name’s Michael I’m very pleased to meet you’. Back then I was a rather unconfident young man, floppy hair and pimpled. I was about to participate in my first and only ‘mock-interview’, to be held in the shadows of Chester Cathedral at the Northgate Street offices of Barclays Bank. I can still feel the pangs of anxiety as I rang the bell and waited for a George Banks type figure to open the door. The finals words of advice from my mother ringing loud in my head, like one of the nearby Cathedral bells…’remember to shake their hand, shake it firmly’.

Occupational Maps: the best kept secret

In a brief preview and to lay some ground work to a forthcoming post from our Vocational education expert, Adam Cotgrave. We thought we would share with you what could be described as the best kept secret of vocational education pathways, Occupational Maps! All Apprenticeships and T Levels are based on occupations recognised by employers. Produced by the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education, the maps bring these occupations together to show where technical education can lead. There are 15 maps in total, one for each route. Simply, if there’s an apprenticeship available in something, it’ll be on a map.

Steering Group – Update

As we enter Phase Two of the network we have made some significant changes to how we operate. Those changes have seen a restructure to the steering group and the staggered introduction of our franchise network model. The restructure of the steering group allows us to broaden our reach in supporting Careers professionals. We found that by focusing solely on Secondary careers education we weren’t lacked the scope to draw important lines to the wider world of careers. Click the headline to learn more about the new structure and the current members of the group.

Careers Education in Primary school is the conversation we should be having

It can often seem that there is a never ending focus on Secondary education issues or achievements. If we viewed our school stages as a family, it could be argued that there is an inverse middle child syndrome at play; With Primary, Further and Higher education siblings looking at Secondary schools as the child that gets all the attention while they’re skills, talents and achievements are largely ignored. Here we examine how recently released reports allow us to switch the focus slightly and once again talk about the importance of Careers education or work related learning needs to start at the Primary level, particularly for disadvantaged young people.

The Link: personal guidance & addressing the needs of each student

We all know that our benchmarks are going to take a hit this year. This is the inevitable outcome of working with young people remotely during a Pandemic. What we need to do now is spend some time examining how we can ensure that student’s individual needs are addressed for the rest of this year and beyond. In the first part of ‘The Link’, we examine how it’s vital to ensure that we are making the most effective use of the information we are gathering in personal guidance sessions.

It’s not the destination, it’s the journey (apart from this year and probably next)

The American philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson once wrote: “life is a journey, not a destination”, this is unquestionably true and we should always remind our students of this. Too often they are forced to focus on their exam results as the perceived destination, which is quite ironic as for this year and possibly next ‘Destinations’ will matter more than exam results. Is your school ready for what’s to come?